A Year After Alec Baldwin Filmed ‘Rust,’ DA Swears Justice

On the one-year anniversary of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins’ death, a top New Mexico prosecutor has renewed his stern warning that “no one is above the law.”

A year ago, actor Alec Baldwin accidentally shot and killed Hutchins and injured director Joel Souza on Friday during a rehearsal for the western “Rust” on a set near Santa Fe.

Although her husband, Matthew Hutchins, has settled a wrongful death lawsuit against the production company, claiming the tragedy was a “terrible accident”, First Court Division attorney Mary Carmack-Altwies said the settlement had nothing to do with the criminal investigation.

In a statement Friday, Carmack-Altwies said she is awaiting a report from the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office and is still considering filing charges against those involved.

The district attorney has already signaled plans to press charges against up to four people, including Baldwin, and appointed a special prosecutor.

Carmack-Altweis “remains committed to seeking justice for victims and getting answers for the community,” spokeswoman Heather Brewer said in the statement. “No one is above the law and all victims deserve justice.”

The killing of Hutchins, which was preceded by complaints among crew members about accidental firearm discharges and other safety lapses, rocked Hollywood and led to calls to ban guns on sets and improve crew safety.

Yet a year after the tragedy, little seems to have changed on film sets to make them safer. While some prop masters and gunsmiths have noticed a shift away from the use of real firearms, legislation to regulate their use in the entertainment industry has stalled.

There is an ongoing review of industry protocols on the use of firearms on sets, but no changes have been agreed upon.

The murder of Hutchins, which was preceded by complaints from crew members of accidental gun discharges and other safety lapses, shocked Hollywood and prompted calls to ban guns on sets and to improve crew safety.

However, a year after the tragedy, little seems to have changed on the sets to make them safer. While some props and gunsmiths have noted a shift in the use of real firearms, legislation to regulate their use in the entertainment industry has stalled.

There is an ongoing review of industry protocols governing the use of weapons on set, but no changes have been agreed upon.

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